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Stronge Astrophotography

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August 2004


Perseid Watch 2004

Name

 
Mark Stronge
Location
  Comber, County Down, Northern Ireland
Website
 
Photo Title
 
Perseid Watch 2004
Time and Date taken
 
August 2004
Equipment used
 
Meade 10inch LX200 and Orion ED80mm both for piggyback and tracking
Capturing device used
 
Canon Digital Rebel 300D 6.3 Megapixel
Technical details
 

ISO400 with various long exposures. Processing in Paint Shop Pro 8

We had a great evening of observing at Big Collin Picnic area, north of Ballyclare with the magificent Slemish mountain directly north of our location. The evening started well with a quick observation of Sunspot 649/656 and then on with the barbeque. The cloud started to come as soon as it got dark and was lingering up until 11pm. After this, it cleared up completely and we were left with just over an hour of beautiful dark skies (for this time of year anyway) and steady, still air. The usual favourites of M13, M27 which was quite beautiful and detailed, M57 which glowed brightly and the Perseus double cluster were the highlights. The rest of the time was spent lookng for Perseids which were infrequent but quite bright with some reaching Mag-7. This was the first time we have used the digital SLR for really long exposures, piggybacked on our 10inch LX200. The scope was setup fairly quickly but the polar alignment was very good and the stars stayted round. The biggest problem was focussing as looking through the viewfinder is very dark and small. The only way of focussing seemed to be by trial and error, using the preview and zoom to check each exposure.

80 second exposure showing Casseopeia, Andromeda and the top of Perseus. A satellite, Iridium 19, is also visible in frame.

The Andromeda Galaxy, the double cluster in Perseus and a thin layer of cloud in this 120 second exposure.

Cloud thickening and showing how light pollution even has it's effects on top of Big Collin. At the top right of the image you can see 2 bright stars of Ursa Major, Alkaid and the double star Mizar and Alcor which is split cleanly in this widefield image. At the bottom right is the satellite ERS-1. Details taken from Starry Night Pro. Exposure was 255 seconds.

After the cloud dispersed I left the shutter open for 100 seconds to capture this beauty of Casseopeia in the Milky Way along with the North American Nebula, the Dumbbell Nebula and Bronchi's cluster (the upside-down coathanger). There is a possible Perseid meteor to the right of the coathanger cluster. Click here for an annotated image.

Another long exposure of 132 seconds showing the depth to the Milk Way. NGC884 the Double Cluster in Perseue, M31 the Andromeda Galaxy with a possible Perseid in the lower left of the frame to the right of the small cloud.

Not giving up, myself and John McC went up to Slieve Croob only to be clouded out in thick fog. The night after we tried again and ended up somewhere outside Crossgar up a lane. There was a very heavy dew which made the use of the dew heater on the camera a necessity, but the skies were darker, though with some localised light pollution. An exposure of 589 seconds with some heavy processing to reduce the orange-ness from the image turned up with this... Again ,you can see the Double Cluster more bright than ever and M31. the constellation of Casseopeia is getting lost in the Milky Way.

 


M13 revisited

Name

 
Mark Stronge
Location
  Comber, County Down, Northern Ireland
Website
 
Photo Title
 
M13 revisited
Time and Date taken
 
13:04hrs BST, 2nd August 2004
Equipment used
 
Orion ED80mm, Vixen GP mount, 2inch WO diagonal, Vibration isolation pads
Capturing device used
 
Canon Digital Rebel 300D 6.3 Megapixel
Technical details
 

ISO400, 30seconds. Hand picked 5 frames out of 10, then aligned and stacked in Registax with final processing in Paint Shop Pro 8


The left image is the full frame image from the camera rotated and resized.
The right image is a centre crop at full resolution.

Not until you start to image deep sky objects with long exposures do you realise how bad light pollution can be. Admittedly, the transparency was poor and the streetlights were making things worse, but when a 30 second exposure of sky is a bright orange, you DO feel like giving up altogether. Longer exposures would have been better but the tracking on the Vixen GP didn't seem to be as good as on previous occasions. The polar alignment may have been off slightly. I did do a dark frame but it turned out I didn't need to as the dark image was completely black with no noise apparent at ISO400 30seconds! Any visible noise is due to me trying to filter out the orange skyglow. This Canon 300D has great potential... The final image was corrected with north up, no mirror image was necessary. Image from Registax was histogram stretched, manually colour corected and a light unsharp mask was applied. Central star cluster was selected individually and gamma adjusted to brighten colours. In the original image, stars down to Mag17 are visible though, due to filtering the light pollution, stars are visible to approximately Mag13 in above images. Original frame showed structure to nearby NGC6207, IC4617 was just a dot.


Sunspot Group 655

Name

 
Mark Stronge
Location
  Comber, County Down, Northern Ireland
Website
 
Photo Title
 
Sunspot group 655
Time and Date taken
 
13:04hrs BST, 2nd August 2004
Equipment used
 
Orion ED80mm, Vixen GP mount, 2inch WO diagonal, IR blocking filter, Baader Contrast Booster, 2x barlow, Baader solar filter, Vibration isolation pads
Capturing device used
 
TouCam Pro
Technical details
 

1/50 shutter speed, 5fps, 250 frames aligned and stacked in Registax with final processing in Paint Shop Pro 8

I first observed this sunspot as it came round the limb a few days ago and it has developed progressively with small sunspots splitting in two and enlarging in only a matter of about 15 minutes. It's the first time I have been able to watch it happen in real time and is absolutely fascinating.

 

 

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