Club News & Events


Remaining Meetings Cancelled PDF Print E-mail

Coronavirus Covid-19 will affect all of us and as with other organisations we don't want to put anyone's life at risk.

We understand that a lot of our members or their family fall into the category of higher risk, also our meetings being held in a school has led us to the decision to cancel the last two meetings of the season.

So, to confirm there will be no meeting on Monday 6th April or Monday 4th May which is also our AGM. We the committee feel this is the correct decision.

Hopefully we will all overcome this and ALL of us will come together again sometime in the near future to enjoy this hobby we love.

Life still goes on and so does Astronomy, so please keep looking up and we will continue to keep you up to date with what's happening out there and any society news through our usual media outlets.

Stay safe
NIAAS Committee.

 
Andrew Johnston PDF Print E-mail

It is with great sadness that we bring you the news of the passing of our honorary member Andrew Johnston (Shown left in this picture). Andrew was one of the original members of our society, the then EAAS and was a keen astronomer. If you search this site you will come across some articles that he had done for us, he had fantastic knowledge and enthusiasm for the club and was a good friend to many of us. I'm sure you will join us in sending our condolences to his family.

 
March 2020 Meeting PDF Print E-mail

The next meeting of the NIAAS is on Monday 2nd March, we are really pleased to welcome our good friend Dr. Mike Simms (National Museums NI) who will be giving us a talk titled '1969 - A Special Year For Space Rocks (and not just the moon).

The meeting starts at 8pm sharp in our usual venue of Ballyclare High School Lecture TheatreDirections can be found here.

About the talk: 1969 was an auspicious time for rocks from space. Meteorite falls at Bovedy in Northern Ireland, Allende in Mexico, and Murchison in Australia, all led to breakthroughs in our understanding of the early Solar System. Rocks brought back by Apollo's 11 and 12 gave us our first chance to find out if the Moon really was made of cheese. And a chance discovery down in Antarctica was to have a fundamental influence on the future of meteoritics for decades to come.

About Mike: Mike is Senior Curator of Natural Sciences and has overall responsibility for the natural sciences collections. When Dippy the Dinosaur visted Belfast, Mike guided vistors to see him and explain all about the famous dinosaur. Mike's responsiblities in his role also extend to geology and meterorites. He has an extensive personal meterorite collection and also discovered the first meteorite crater in the UK. In fact it's one of the largest in the world!

So with such a wide range of knowledge in his field, this is definitely going to be a talk not to be missed.

 

Please note: Under 16's are very welcome but due to our child protection policy, we ask that they are accompanied by an adult.

As always we will have refreshments available after the meeting, a donation bucket is available at the door if you wish to support us in our work!

Hope to see you all there!

 
February 2020 meeting PDF Print E-mail

For our next meeting our very own night sky expert Stevie Beasant will be giving us a talk entitled 'Orion, more than a nebula'  Of course there is a lot of excitement in the Orion constellation with the star Betelgeuse dramatically dimming recently.  This is a red supergiant that will at some point go supernova.  Many thought this dimming was a prelude to an iimminent explosion, but that seems to not be the case though.  Other than that it's a fascinating constellation to observe with many delights that Stevie will tell us about.

It will be on Monday 3rd February, it starts at 8pm sharp in our usual venue of Ballyclare High School Lecture TheatreDirections can be found here.

 
January 2020 meeting PDF Print E-mail

A very merry Christmas and Happy New Year from the NIAAS

For our first meeting of the new year and indeed a new decade, we are really pleased to welcome Prof Mark Bailey, who will be giving us a talk titled 'Societal impacts and long-term climate archives at Armagh Observatory'.

It will be on Monday 6th January, it starts at 8pm sharp in our usual venue of Ballyclare High School Lecture Theatre. Directions can be found here.

 

Please note: Under 16's are very welcome but due to our child protection policy, we ask that they are accompanied by an adult.

As always we will have refreshments available after the meeting, a donation bucket is available at the door if you wish to support us in our work!

Hope to see you all there!

 
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