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Sky @ Night


Brand new page dedicated to the practical observer including :

 

Observing highlights


Observing challenges

Have a look for these objects below and let us know about them on the EAAS Forum.

  • The Moon. Everyday the libration and illumination are different and there is always lots to observe along the terminator. See below for the current Moon phase.
  • Uranus is well placed for observing with a transit time of around 2200UT. See how many moons, if any, you can observe and let us know on the EAAS Forum.
  • M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, transit 0015UT, Mag4.5 is an easy target and best observed in binoculars or wide field telescopes.
  • M15, the Pegasus Cluster, transit 2100UT, Mag7.5.
  • M39, Open Cluster, transit 2105UT, Mag5.5.
  • Enif and Scheat, details below.
  • M52, Open Cluster, transit 2300UT, Mag8.0.
  • NGC457, Owl Cluster, transit 0045UT, Mag6.4.
  • NGC869, NGC884, Perseus Double Cluster, transit 0200UT, Mag5.5. Beautiful in wide field telescope.

Constellation Highlight

Pegasus is easily recognised by 4 stars which form a large square known as The Great Square of Pegasus. One of the stars of the Great Square used to be delta Pegasi Alpheratz (Sirrah), but is now assigned to the constellation of Andromeda. Pegasus was the winged horse of mythology, created by Neptune, born of sand, sea-foam and Medusa’s (patron saint of Bad Hair Day :-) blood.

Messier object number 15 is a globular cluster which may be visible to eagle-eyed observers with the naked eye under very dark skies. This impressive cluster is easily seen with binoculars as a round fuzzy patch. M15 has a bright compressed core surrounded by a faint halo of stars. With a larger instrument more stars become visible in the outer periphery with some brighter members resolved in the centre. M15 is one of only a handful of globular clusters known to contain a planetary nebula.

Enif is a double star with components of widely unequal brightness. The main star is a 2nd-mag orange supergiant; its companion is of 8th-mag.

Scheat is a red giant irregular variable that fluctuates between 2nd and 3rd mag. with no set period.

 

ISS Passes

For detailed sightings information and sky charts, check out HeavensAbove Click Here.

The ISS is currently passing during the day and there are a number of opportunities to capture the ISS as it passes in front of the Sun.

 

Total Lunar Eclipse
28th October 2004

In the early hours of Thursday 28th October (no we can't re-schedule), the Moon will pass through the Earth's shadow causing it to appear a deep red colour. This will not happen again until 3/4th March 2007 so it will be well worth getting up for and watching.

The EAAS plan to have an observing and photographing session and possibly a live webcast so be sure and keep checking the EAAS Forum for details on where we will be. Everyone is welcome to come along and observe with us.

For more information, check out the Lunar Eclipse page.

 

 

Monthly Observing Guide


I'm sure like most astronomers, you get outside, get the scope setup, and then after 20 minutes of looking at Saturn, Jupiter and the Moon you wonder what to look at next. Well, now there is a free monthly guide to what the best deep sky objects are for every month of the year. This comes in the form of a freely downloadable PDF document, click below to download it.

This month's observing guide (updated on 1st of every month)

Don't forget that our very own EAAS Newsletter has a monthly observing guide to the planets and club news. You can download the latest EAAS Newsletter here.

 

Interactive Star Chart


 

Lunar Observing


If you cannot see the lunar phase image above you need to install Java Virtual Machine

Lunar Phases for October 2004
Wed Thur Fri Sat Sun Mon Tues
   

1

2
3

4

5
6
last qtr
7
8 9 10 11 12
13 14
new
15
16

17

18 19
20
21
first qtr
22
23 24 25 26
27
28
Full Moon
29

30

31

   

Dark Skies Chart

Times of Moon Rise and Moon Set
Date (d/m/y) Moon Rise Moon Set
Date (d/m/y) Moon Rise Moon Set
Date (d/m/y) Moon Rise Moon Set
Date (d/m/y) Moon Rise Moon Set

 

1/9/2021 21:12 9:19
2/9/2021 21:21 10:42
3/9/2021 21:31 12:04
4/9/2021 21:44 13:25
5/9/2021 22:01 14:44
6/9/2021 22:26 16:00
7/9/2021 23:03 17:07
8/9/2021 23:55 18:01
9/9/2021 --- 18:41
10/9/2021 1:00 19:09
11/9/2021 2:16 19:28
12/9/2021 3:36 19:42
13/9/2021 4:58 19:52
14/9/2021 6:20 20:01
15/9/2021 7:42 20:09
16/9/2021 9:05 20:17
17/9/2021 10:31 20:27
18/9/2021 12:01 20:40
19/9/2021 13:34 20:59
20/9/2021 15:06 21:28
21/9/2021 16:27 22:14
22/9/2021 17:29 23:23
23/9/2021 18:09 ---
24/9/2021 18:34 0:49
25/9/2021 18:50 2:23
26/9/2021 19:02 3:56
27/9/2021 19:11 5:26
28/9/2021 19:19 6:52
29/9/2021 19:28 8:16
30/9/2021 19:37 9:39

 

 

1/10/2021 19:48 11:01
2/10/2021 20:04 12:23
3/10/2021 20:25 13:42
4/10/2021 20:57 14:54
5/10/2021 21:43 15:55
6/10/2021 22:43 16:40
7/10/2021 23:55 17:12
8/10/2021 --- 17:34
9/10/2021 1:13 17:49
10/10/2021 2:33 18:00
11/10/2021 3:55 18:09
12/10/2021 5:17 18:17
13/10/2021 6:41 18:26
14/10/2021 8:07 18:35
15/10/2021 9:38 18:47
16/10/2021 11:13 19:03
17/10/2021 12:48 19:29
18/10/2021 14:16 20:10
19/10/2021 15:25 21:12
20/10/2021 16:12 22:34
21/10/2021 16:40 ---
22/10/2021 16:59 0:06
23/10/2021 17:11 1:38
24/10/2021 17:20 3:07
25/10/2021 17:29 4:32
26/10/2021 17:36 5:55
27/10/2021 17:45 7:17
28/10/2021 17:55 8:39
29/10/2021 18:08 10:01
30/10/2021 18:27 11:22
31/10/2021 17:54 11:38

 

 

1/11/2021 18:34 12:45
2/11/2021 19:29 13:36
3/11/2021 20:36 14:13
4/11/2021 21:51 14:38
5/11/2021 23:10 14:55
6/11/2021 --- 15:07
7/11/2021 0:30 15:17
8/11/2021 1:50 15:25
9/11/2021 3:12 15:33
10/11/2020 4:36 15:41
11/11/2020 6:05 15:52
12/11/2020 7:40 16:07
13/11/2020 9:18 16:28
14/11/2020 10:53 17:03
15/11/2020 12:13 17:59
16/11/2020 13:10 19:18
17/11/2020 13:45 20:49
18/11/2020 14:06 22:23
19/11/2020 14:20 23:54
20/11/2020 14:30 ---
21/11/2020 14:39 1:20
22/11/2020 14:46 2:42
23/11/2020 14:54 4:02
24/11/2020 15:03 5:23
25/11/2020 15:15 6:44
26/11/2020 15:31 8:04
27/11/2020 15:55 9:23
28/11/2020 16:30 10:33
29/11/2020 17:19 11:31
30/11/2020 18:22 12:12

 

1/12/2020 19:35 12:41
2/12/2020 20:52 13:00
3/12/2020 22:10 13:14
4/12/2020 23:28 13:24
5/12/2020 --- 13:32
6/12/2020 0:47 13:40
7/12/2020 2:07 13:47
8/12/2020 3:32 13:57
9/12/2020 5:02 14:09
10/12/2020 6:38 14:26
11/12/2020 8:17 14:54
12/12/2020 9:48 15:41
13/12/2020 10:57 16:52
14/12/2020 11:42 18:23
15/12/2020 12:10 20:01
16/12/2020 12:27 21:36
17/12/2020 12:39 23:05
18/12/2020 12:48 ---
19/12/2020 12:56 0:30
20/12/2020 13:04 1:52
21/12/2020 13:12 3:12
22/12/2020 13:23 4:32
23/12/2020 13:37 5:52
24/12/2020 13:58 7:10
25/12/2020 14:29 8:23
26/12/2020 15:13 9:25
27/12/2020 16:13 10:11
28/12/2020 17:23 10:44
29/12/2020 18:39 11:05
30/12/2020 19:57 11:20
31/12/2020 21:14 11:31

 

Jovian Satellite transits

 

If you cannot see the image above you need to install Java Virtual Machine


 

Latest Weather Reports from around Ireland


Click on the white buttons to view the latest weather information from each weather station.

For the latest weather forecasts check out the UK Weather Portal

Latest Weather Report

 

 

Malin Head Eglington, Londonderry Aldegrove Airport Belfast Harbour Bangor Harbour Dromore Knock Airport, Connaught Belmullet Birr Castle Ashford, Wicklow Dublin Shannon Valentia Observatory Cork Clones Mullingar Kilkenny Rosslare

 

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Malin Head Eglington, Londonderry Aldegrove Airport Belfast Harbour Bangor Harbour Dromore Armagh Observatory Knock Airport, Connaught Belmullet Birr Castle Ashford, Wicklow Dublin Shannon Valentia Observatory Cork Clones Mullingar Kilkenny Rosslare